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The event you are looking at is a past event. Check out this upcoming event Sporting Lunchtime Lectures: James Mason happening on Sat Apr 06 2019 at 11:00 am at The Record Café, 45-47 North Parade, BD1 3JH City of Bradford, Bradford, United Kingdom

Lunchtime Lectures

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Lunchtime Lectures




THIS IS A FREE, DROP-IN EVENT AND SO YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BOOK TICKETS.


Every Thursday, different speakers on different subjects at Bristol Central Library.

12.30pm - 1.20pm



10th January

Cameron Dawkins, author

Local author Cameron Dawkins will share in this lecture the process of self-publishing and talk about to talk about his new novel 'They’re demons'.


17th January

Gemma Brace, Exhibition and Engagement Officer at University of Bristol Theatre Collection

Sharing the Messel Magic

Coinciding with the exhibition Wake Up and Dream – Oliver Messel: Theatre, Art and Society at the University of Bristol Theatre Collection, curator Gemma Brace will be delving into the magical world of one of the twentieth century’s most applauded theatre designers Oliver Messel (1904-1978). The talk will journey though Messel’s dazzling personal life as one of London’s ‘Bright Young Things’ as well as exploring lesser known stories such as his social campaigning. Covering his fascinating career which encompassed theatre, ballet, opera and film, as well as portraiture, interior design and architecture, we will be exploring how objects can be used to bring stories to life through an artist whose Archive encourages us to both look back and reflect and to ‘wake up and dream’.


24th January

DB Deerhurst, author

The immigrant experience: Henry Handel Richardson, Doris Lessing and Isaac Bashevis Singer

Author DB Deerhurst will examine three authors’ works which examine the experiences of immigrants and share how his experiences of immigration inspired his novel, ‘Assimilation.’


31st January

Ben Barber, mathematician at the University of Bristol

One two many: why is 3 so much bigger than 2?

Across mathematics you encounter situations where changing a 2 to a 3 turns a manageable problem into a completely untractable one.   I'll explain some examples of this phenomenon and speculate wildly about what is going on 





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